WITH 90.1 FM

Sound Opinions

Monday 6 - 7 PM

The World's only radio rock talk show. Listen Mondays at  6 p.m. Take two nationally respected rock critics, the latest music news, personal commentary, and exclusive interviews and performances, add a huge pile of records old and new, and the result is Sound Opinions—the world's only rock and roll talk show. Based in Chicago, Sound Opinions is hosted by Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot, two of the finest and best-recognized pop music writers in the nation. For over a decade they were dedicated competitors at Chicago’s two daily newspapers—Jim at the Chicago Sun-Times and Greg at the Chicago Tribune. Today, Jim writes about music for WBEZ.org and teaches criticism at Columbia College.  Every week, Sound Opinions fires up smart and spirited discussions about a wide range of popular music, from indie rock to classic rock, hip hop to R&B, and every genre under the sun. Sound Opinions' consistently informed, engaging, and controversial dialogue makes it a unique and essential source for the top stories, albums, and trends in music. This is cutting-edge criticism and journalism presented in the great tradition of Siskel and Ebert. The discussion is as indispensible to the hardcore music fan as it is to the casual music fan who feels out of touch.  Sound Opinions is a direct result of the experience and credibility of its creators. Jim and Greg are both critically acclaimed authors who also write for some of the nation's most prestigious rock magazines, including Rolling Stone, Spin, and Vibe. To learn more and listen to past shows, click here.

Part 4 of TED Radio Hour episode The Food Connection

How should we ethically feed our world? Are we supposed to return to organic pastoral practices or trust new technology? Journalist Amanda Little believes the answer lies in the middle.

About Amanda Little

Part 3 of TED Radio Hour episode The Food Connection

Social entrepreneur Jasmine Crowe has one mission: feed more, waste less. Her company Goodr is tackling food waste and getting food to those who need it most.

About Jasmine Crowe

Part 2 of TED Radio Hour episode: The Food Connection

The loss of Native American food traditions has been taking place for centuries. At Owamni, chef Sean Sherman is trying to change that by serving food that celebrates and preserves Dakota cooking.

About Sean Sherman

About The Episode

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. But it's also shaped by global norms. This hour, journalist Elise Hu reflects on what's considered beautiful now, and how we'll think about beauty in the future.

About Elise Hu

About The Episode

This hour, journalist Saleem Reshamwala gives us a tour of surprising people and places — Lima, Nairobi, and prehistoric New Jersey — to inspire new perspectives on travel and cultures.

About Saleem Reshamwala

Saleem Reshamwala is a journalist and filmmaker. Currently, he is the host of the TED podcast, Far Flung, which explores ideas around the globe.

Part 4 of TED Radio Hour episode The Public Commons

Artist Matthew Mazzotta says every community needs public spaces to gather, discuss, and address issues. He works with towns to reimagine overlooked buildings and give them a new public purpose.

About Matthew Mazzotta

Part 3 of TED Radio Hour episode The Public Commons

Wikipedian Jake Orlowitz describes how volunteers update the world's largest encyclopedia. And co-founder Jimmy Wales says the site must not only be a neutral space, but one that encourages diversity.

About Jimmy Wales

Part 2 of TED Radio Hour episode The Public Commons

Eli Pariser has an optimistic vision for our digital public spaces. He says that by structuring them like real-life parks, libraries, and town halls, we can create more welcoming, safe places online.

About Eli Pariser

Part 1 of TED Radio Hour episode The Public Commons

Public places don't always fully meet the needs of a community. Shari Davis explains how participatory budgeting can give us all a voice in creating safer and more equitable public spaces.

About Shari Davis

Part 3 of TED Radio Hour episode: An SOS From The Ocean

In 1998, Alasdair Harris went to Madagascar to research coral reefs. He's worked there ever since. He explains the true meaning of conservation he learned from the island's Indigenous communities.

About Alasdair Harris

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