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Afropop Worldwide

Saturday 3 - 4 PM

"Afropop Worldwide" is America's first and longest-lived weekly program on the music of Africa and the African Diaspora. Hosted by Georges Collinet from Cameroon and produced by Sean Barlow for World Music Productions, "Afropop Worldwide" draws on an unprecedented array of reporters, artists and cultural guides to present an hour that is authoritative, comprehensive and hugely entertaining. Homepage:  http://www.afropop.org/

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(SOUNDBITE OF YOUTUBE VIDEO, "HAMILTON MASK-UP PARODY MEDLEY")

THE HOLDERNESS FAMILY: (Rapping) I am not throwing away this mask.

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Vivian Garcia Leonard studied to become a pharmacist in Cuba before coming to the U.S. in 1961.

Her daughter, also named Vivian, eventually followed in her mother's footsteps. So, too, did her daughter, Marissa Sofia Ochs. Today, the three generations of pharmacists live near each other and work in New York City.

But recently, the elder Vivian, who's 82, stopped working to limit her exposure to the virus.

In a remote StoryCorps conversation recorded last month, the women talked about living through the coronavirus pandemic.

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OK. So that was in Texas, but cases are also surging in other states, including California. California's Democratic governor, Gavin Newsom, said 19 counties will have to partially shut down again. Here he is.

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When Christian Picciolini was a neo-Nazi, he heard the term "white power" all the time. It was the term neo-Nazis used as a greeting, as a pejorative, to instill fear, even to sign off letters in lieu of "sincerely."

"It was also a proclamation that distilled what we believed in into two words," Picciolini — who is now an author and founder of the Free Radicals Project, a group that works to prevent extremism — told NPR's Morning Edition.

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