WITH 90.1 FM

Stephen Thompson

This week's Saturday Night Live asked a lot of Harry Styles, as it brought the former One Direction star onboard to serve as both its host and its musical guest.

YouTube

We're barely done scraping the frost off the disintegrating jack o' lanterns we neglected to remove from our front porches, and it's already time to argue about "Baby, It's Cold Outsid

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

George Michael fans, rejoice. His latest single is "This Is How (We Want You To Get High)." And it dropped this week.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THIS IS HOW (WE WANT YOU TO GET HIGH)")

When it comes to bands performing at the Tiny Desk, there's dressing up, and then there's dressing up. Just in time for Halloween, we've pulled together a handy playlist starring artists whose stage wear crosses over from "outfits" to "costumes."

Twenty-five years ago this fall, Sheryl Crow was in the midst of a massive career breakthrough. Her inescapable hit "All I Wanna Do" was entrenched in the Top 5 — it would later win the Grammy for Record of the Year — and her 1993 debut album, Tuesday Night Music Club, was well on its way to selling more than 7 million copies in the U.S. alone. The years since have been similarly kind. A heavily decorated but eternally approachable rock-and-roll lifer, Crow has released 11 albums and won nine Grammys en route to her latest, a duets collection called Threads.

Back in the before-times, a pop star would release a single and it'd climb the charts, hit a peak position and begin a slow descent into oblivion. The whole process might take a few months, and then it'd be on to the next single.

YouTube

In 1984, Chaka Khan enjoyed a career-revitalizing smash with "I Feel

YouTube

Between Two Ferns, the Zach Galifianakis comedy series, is full of awkward celebrity encounters and interviews gone haywire.

When Sharon Van Etten made her Tiny Desk debut back in the fall of 2010, her voice exuded fragile, gentle grace. Performing songs from that year's Epic, she huddled around a single acoustic guitar with backup singer Cat Martino to perform a set of tender and evocative folk-pop songs.

Pages